Work Group on Qualitative Research

Graduate Qualitative Methods Courses

Current/Upcoming Courses for Spring 2020:


Course Number

Course Title

Short Description

Semester Taught

C&T 808

Qualitative Research: Curriculum Inquiry

Curriculum Inquiry provides an opportunity to reflect, explore, understand, and broaden perspectives of curriculum through examining the theories, methodologies, strategies, and design of qualitative research. This course is designed to develop a common understanding of the major elements of qualitative research, while offering each student an opportunity to examine research topics and methods of personal interest, with particular attention to curricular issues. The course also includes practical experience with various modes of data collection and analysis.

Fall 2020
(Hutchinson, Derek)

ELPS 871

Introduction to Qualitative Research

An introduction to the foundations of and techniques associated with qualitative research methods. Students will practice interview and participant observation skills and will analyze and interpret data. Additional topics include crafting qualitative research questions, ethics of fieldwork, and establishing trustworthiness of data. Common traditions of qualitative methods employed in education and other related fields will be introduced.

Fall 2020
(Mollet, Amanda) & (Foste, Zachary)

LING 720

Research Methods in Linguistics

This course provides a foundation for designing, conducting, and critically evaluating quantitative and qualitative research in the language sciences. Topics include formulating a research hypothesis, participant selection, ethical considerations, the scientific method, validity, reliability, data collection, dependent and independent variables, descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will serve students who are interested in the basics of research design and statistics for the study of language. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course.

Fall 2020
(Coughlin, Kate)

WGSS 501

Doing Feminist Research

How is feminist research more than research that just focuses on women? What does it mean to do research in a feminist way? This course explores feminist critiques of traditional methods and asks how we can build knowledge that is more just, collaborative, and politically engaged. Students practice basic skills in qualitative research methods like interviewing and participant observation, and they learn how to design their own research project using these methods. Suggested for the junior year. Prerequisite: Any previous coursework in WGSS or by permission of instructor.

Fall 2020
(Vanderhurst, Stacey) & (DeRoy, Pere)




Previously taught courses:


Course Number

Course Title

Short Description

Semester Taught

AMS 803

Research Methods in American Studies

An introduction to the range of interdisciplinary research methods in American studies. Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the assumptions, logics, and procedures involved in various approaches to understanding American society and culture.

Spring 2015
(Flores, Ruben)

Spring 2019
(Tucker, Sherrie)

AMS 804

Research Seminar

An intensive application of theoretical and methodological issues to the development of specific substantive research problems. Students will be expected to design and implement a study that will be critically assessed in the seminar.

Fall 2015
(Hamer, Jennifer)

AMS 998

U.S. Ethnography

This course is a graduate seminar in contemporary ethnography based on field research in the United States. Readings center on a selection of recent works, most grounded in social and cultural anthropology, that will survey the state of the field, and introduce current problems and approaches in ethnographic research and writing. Complementary readings will provide background on perennial questions that ethnographers face concerning issues such as research ehtics, the politics of representation, methods and materials, and ethnography as knowledge production. The course will be useful to graduate students preparing to conduct ethnographic research, writing from completed fieldwork, or drawing on the ethnographic literature for interdisciplinary projects. Students will complete a major writing assignment customized to their own research and stage in their degree programs.

Spring 2014 & Fall 2016

(Chappell, Ben)

AMS 998

Oral History

This seminar will be divided between intensive reading/discussion meetings in which we engage theories and methods of oral history, practicum sessions on oral history and other interview-based research methods; and a writing workshop on how to integrate insights from oral history research in interdisciplinary scholarship. Practicum sessions will include interview training and practice among seminar participants; learning how interview-based research is archived and conducted at KU; and transcription and analysis of interviews. The seminar is designed for graduate students who intend to use oral history or qualitative interview-based research in thesis or dissertation. Projects may be at any stage—from planning stages to chapter-drafting—but equal participation will be expected of participants with new projects and those with advanced projects. We will conclude with a writing workshop with peer reviews of participants’ attempts to incorporate interview-based research into final papers. Graduate students are encouraged to use this seminar for planning, launching, or continuing interview-based thesis or dissertation research and writing.

Spring 2016
(Tucker, Sherrie)

Spring 2020
Chappell,Ben

ANTH 707

Responsible Research and Scholarship in Anthropology

This course examines a range of issues critical to responsible research, scholarship, and practice in anthropology. Topics include: anthropological codes of ethics; protection of human subjects, informed consent, and confidentiality; appropriate conduct in field and laboratory research; data management, curation, and dissemination; proper protocols for authorship, submission of publications, and peer review; classified and proprietary research; mentor-student relationships; professional collaborations. Required for all doctoral students in anthropology, but master’s students and graduate students in other fields are welcome.

Spring 2014 & Spring 2015
(Stull, Don)

ANTH 775

Topics in Digital Ethnography: Digital Data Management and Analysis

While other courses in qualitative methods teach students the diverse means through which they may collect information in the field and traditional modes of analysis, this seminar will focus on four critical skills, currently unaddressed in the cultural anthropology curriculum: (1) how to employ digital tools to facilitate the collection of diverse kinds of data, including digital note taking while conducting participant observation; digital journaling; transcribing digital audio files from interviews; scanning archival documents; and communicating within virtual environments; (2) to develop and articulate a data management strategy and to understand the general rules of appropriate data management in accordance with responsible conduct of research, such as, best practices regarding the protection of written and electronic data from physical damage and the protection of data integrity, including damage from tampering and theft; (3) to evaluate the capacities, strengths, an weakness of software applications and technological devices in the analysis of ethnographic findings: including annotating, indexing, coding, and enumerating data; writing memos and running searches/queries; as well as responding to issues related to validity, reliability, and sampling in ethnographic research; and (4) to critically appraise the cultural, political and ethical implications of these technologies and the innovations they enable in the societies in which we work.

Spring 2015
(Rhine, Katie)

ANTH 783

Doing Ethnography

Different research problems and field settings call for different research techniques. But ethnography is usually the most important skill, and the method of choice, for sociocultural anthropologists, as it is for an increasing number of social scientists and humanists from other disciplines. This course explores ethnographic research methods and activities: how ethnographers prepare for the field, do their fieldwork, then report it. The course draws heavily from disciplines other than anthropology. Students do not need a background in anthropology to take it, but it does have an anthropological slant. Although ethnographers have been accused of paying less attention to methodology than they should, and much less than their quantitatively oriented colleagues, there is still a massive literature on ethnographic methods. We cannot begin to do ethnography justice in one semester. Instead, we will focus on practical issues, paying special attention to the role of writing in ethnography--grant writing, field notes, "writing up field notes." The ethics of ethnographic research and reporting will be a recurrent theme in our discussions.

Spring 2014, Spring 2015 & Spring 2019
(Stull, Don)

Spring 2017
(Metz, Brett)

Fall 2018 & Spring 2019
(Takeyama, Akiko)

COMS 851

Communication Research/Historical and Descriptive

An introduction to types of historical and descriptive research in human communication. Library resources and methods of research will be covered. Emphasis will be placed upon preparing a research prospectus and upon writing the research report.

Fall 2015
(Childers, Jay)

COMS 855

Qualitative Research Methods in Communication Studies

Study of strategies for describing communication behavior in particular contexts, emphasizing ethnography and specific observational and interview data gathering and analysis methods.

Spring 2020
(Oliha-Donaldson, Hannah)

COMS 936

Seminar in Language & Discourse

This seminar uses interdisciplinary readings to examine central theoretical questions regarding language and communication. The course moves from considering major theoretical positions to current research in communication on discourse. Methodological issues in the study of language and discourse are also addressed.

Spring 2019
(Hummert, Mary)

C&T 806

Instructional Strategies & Models

Analysis of models of teaching which represent distinct orientations toward students and how they learn. The application of these models is complemented by the study of research evidence on effective teaching strategies.

Spring 2019
(Hutchinson, Derek)

C&T 808

Qualitative Research: Curriculum Inquiry

Curriculum Inquiry provides an opportunity to reflect, explore, understand, and broaden perspectives of curriculum through examining the theories, methodologies, strategies, and design of qualitative research. This course is designed to develop a common understanding of the major elements of qualitative research, while offering each student an opportunity to examine research topics and methods of personal interest, with particular attention to curricular issues. The course also includes practical experience with various modes of data collection and analysis.

Fall 2014 & Fall 2015
(Hamilton, Mary Lynn E.)

C&T 906

Qualitative and Curriculum Inquiry: Analysis and Introduction

Supports novice researchers in extending their understanding of the theoretical frameworks underlying qualitative research, qualitative methodologies, the research process and its relationship with curriculum inquiry. During the course we will discuss various forms of qualitative research methods, approaches to research, and perspectives in methodology relate to curriculum inquiry. We will explore the intertwining of data generation, analysis, and writing. In addition, we will focus on refining data generation techniques, strategies for data analysis, data interpretation, and various forms of reporting/writing.

Spring 2014 & Spring 2015
(Hamilton, Mary Lynn)

Spring 2020
(Hutchinson, Derek)

ELPS 871

Introduction to Qualitative Research

An introduction to the foundations of and techniques associated with qualitative research methods. Students will practice interview and participant observation skills and will analyze and interpret data. Additional topics include crafting qualitative research questions, ethics of fieldwork, and establishing trustworthiness of data. Common traditions of qualitative methods employed in education and other related fields will be introduced.

Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Spring 2016, & Fall 2018
(Ng, Jennifer)

ELPS 998

Education Leadership & Policy Studies Seminar

Advanced qualitative research.

Spring 2020
(Foste, Zachary)

ENGL 690

Introduction to Digital Humanities

Digital technologies have affected some of the most important activities constituting how we learn and teach, including the way we access information, produce knowledge, and communicate. This shift has also created a stimulating scholarly context for educators and students in the Humanities and Social Sciences to be creative and critical of their practices, cultures, and assumptions about the digital locally and globally. In this two-part course we will survey a set of Digital Humanities concepts, tools, and approaches intended to transform the students’ everyday involvement with the Web and electronic devices into critical, argumentative, and creative practices, and to explore the digital from and towards a humanities perspective. However, this is not a theoretical course, each problem, approach, and consideration will be tackled hands on. All students will be required to propose, plan, and develop a small project in collaboration with their peers. Please email Prof. Ortega for a registration code at elikaortega@ku.edu

Fall 2015
(Ortega, Élika)

ENGL 690

Digital Humanities and the World Out There

This course engages critically with the way in which digital technologies have shaped–and continue to shape–our understanding of the world we live in. Digital Humanities and the World Out There sets out from the premise that we inhabit a post-Internet world where social, academic, artistic, economic, and political practices have to some degree been impacted by the development and popularization of the Internet. The course, then, touches on a variety of topics such as interface design, social media, Internet accessibility around the world, digital labor, media obsolescence cycles, and business models intersecting both current cultural production in the arts and humanities and the everyday understanding and involvement with our digitally mediated surroundings. Activities in the course include seminar discussions of important scholarly and creative works, workshop sessions aimed at equipping students with a working set of technical skills, and ultimately, the collaborative development of a creative or scholarly digital project. Digital Humanities and the World Out There builds upon the work done during ENGL690 Introduction to Digital Humanities (Fall 2015) but it is not serialized. No previous knowledge is necessary and all incoming students are welcome. For more information visit Dr. Ortega’s website (http://elikaortega.net/courses) after October 31st.

Spring 2016
(Ortegam Élika)

FMS 800

Introduction to Film and Media Studies

This course places major emphasis upon the principles of research, bibliographical data, and research methods useful in film and television. The course should be taken at the beginning of the graduate student's program.

Fall 2017 & Fall 2018
(Halegoua, Germaine)

FMS 902

Methods and Applications for Digital Media Studies

This seminar is designed to introduce students from various disciplinary backgrounds to the theories, qualitative methods, and applications of new media studies. Through a series of approaches, frameworks, and specific case studies we will explore what constitutes "new media studies", its objects of inquiry, histories and futures of this evolving field, some ways to conduct academically rigorous scholarship within the realm of new media. Over the course of the semester we will critique and apply various methodologies to web and cell phone-based cultures, digital hardware and software, as well as other networked technologies and practices. This course is also designed to help graduate students think about their own pedagogy for digital media instruction, familiarize themselves with topics and debates in new media studies research, and cultivate pre-existing projects or new interests. The intention of the course is to enrich the study of digital technology through the incorporation of interdisciplinary perspectives with an emphasis on socio-cultural power within the analysis of media technology and media practice. The seminar will conclude with the production of a semester-long research project, formal presentation of research, and a sample syllabus.

Fall 2014
(Halegoua, Germaine)

FMS 902

Methods and Applications for New Media Studies

Methods and Applications for New Media Studies is a qualitative methods course that allows students to explore digital methods for humanities and interdisciplinary research projects as well as the application of traditional qualitative methods to digital environments and research. We read and discuss writing by leading digital media studies scholars in order to understand methodological practices as well as their findings and conclusions.

Spring 2017
(Halegoua, Germaine)

GEOG 875

Qualitative Research Methods

This course provides background on qualitative research methods used in human geography. Students will gain a critical perspective into relevant issues of qualitative methods with specific regard to ethical concerns related to human subjects research within the social sciences and humanities and the debates and approaches within the changing landscapes of qualitative methods. Students will have the opportunity to practice these techniques and strategies in a group research project. Prerequisite: GEOG 805 or consent of instructor.

Spring 2020
(Johnson, Jay)

GEOG 980

Qualitative Research Methods

Spring 2016
(Johnson, Jay)

GIST 610

Interdisciplinary Methods Global Context

An introduction to a variety of widely-employed quantitative and qualitative research methods in the social sciences and humanities, including methods such as statistical analysis, ethnography, and content analysis.

Fall 2015
(Wuthrich, Mike)

JOUR 801 and 802

Mass Comm Methodology I - Qualitative

Advanced study of qualitative methodological approaches to the study of media. The class emphasis is using interpretative research tools and techniques from narrative analysis, to ethnography, historical analysis, to critical cultural approaches to learn about messages, media, and audiences. Each student devised a research project during the course.

Fall 2016
Thursdays
4:30-7:00PM
(Belmas, Genelle)

JOUR 802

Research II: Methods

An introduction to methodological approaches to the study of media. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies are reviewed. The class emphasis is on learning appropriate research tools to scientifically learn about messages, media, and audiences. Each student devises a research project during the course. Prerequisite: JOUR 801.

Fall 2015
(Barnett, Barbara)

JOUR 804

Mass Communication Methodology I-Qualitative

Advanced study of qualitative methodological approaches to the study of media. The class emphasis is using interpretative research tools and techniques from narrative analysis, to ethnography, historical analysis, to critical cultural approaches to learn about messages, media, and audiences. Each student devises a research project during the course. 

Spring 2014 (Barnett, Barbara)

JOUR 840

Social Media Research

This course will cover theories and research methods related to digital/social media-facilitated communication. We will cover both qualitative and quantitative approaches to related topics. It is a special topics course rather than a pure research method course.

Fall 2015 & Fall 2019
(Seo, Hyunjin)

JOUR 829

Marketing Communications Research

Students learn how marketing and media research help determine the success of an organization's marketing planning and strategic communications processes. Students study and conduct primary and secondary research - both qualitative and quantitative - including focus groups, ethnography and surveys.

Spring 2015
Regents/Edwards Campus
(Bobkowski, Piotr)

LING 720

Research Methods in Linguistics

This course provides a foundation for designing, conducting, and critically evaluating quantitative and qualitative research in the language sciences. Topics include formulating a research hypothesis, participant selection, ethical considerations, the scientific method, validity, reliability, data collection, dependent and independent variables, descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will serve students who are interested in the basics of research design and statistics for the study of language. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course.

Fall 2015
(Tremblay, Annie)

MEMT 798

Qualitative Research in Music Therapy

This course will provide an overview of the principles of qualitative research in music therapy, including theoretical perspectives, research design, methodology, data collection and analysis.  Students will complete participant observations and in-depth interviews, explore new developments in the field, and discover practical applications for music therapy practice. For graduate students in the School of Music or by permission of the instructor.

Fall 2014, Fall 2016, & Fall 2018
(Dvorak, Abbey)

POLS 708

Advanced Qualitative Methods

This course is designed as a survey of qualitative methods and as a laboratory to practice using the techniques and strategies. This course assumes you have had basic courses in research design and methodology. Over the course of the semester, we will examine some of the main methods used by qualitative researchers in the social sciences, and we analyze the comparative strengths and weaknesses of each method as well as discuss the most appropriate method for different research questions. This course has several primary objectives. One is to familiarize you with the methodological and epistemological debates concerning qualitative research. The second is to give you as many practical, applied tools as possible during the course of the semester. The third is to allow you to practice and implement these tools in a pilot project. The fourth is to read and discuss work by qualitative researchers, especially focusing on the lessons they learned and the challenges they faced. The fifth is to help you understand how to move from project design, to project implementation, to data analysis and reporting. We will be conducting a live lab during the course of the semester to apply these methods to a local study.

Spring 2016
(Britton, Hannah)

POLS 878

Conducting Fieldwork in Developing Countries

This course is designed for practical interviews and qualitative surveys in non-traditional settings. There will be several visiting Chinese PhD students who are involved in the Stanford University Rural Education Action Project and several NGO projects that required interviews and qualitative surveys. They will audit the class and give some presentations on NGO work. There will be a nice range of academic and professional qualitative research.

Fall 2016 & Fall 2018
(Kennedy, John)

PUAD 934

Research Methods in Public Administration

The course examines issues of research and epistemology with an emphasis on connecting theory and research and doing research in field settings.

Fall 2015
(Lane, Bradley)

PUAD 937

Qualitative Methods in Public Administration

This course examines the concepts and practices of qualitative research. The focus will be on field research and the collection of "textual data" through observation, interviewing, and documents. The course will also examine the interpretation and analysis of qualitative data and how to present qualitative findings.

Fall 2013 (Maynard-Moody, Steven)

Spring 20202
(Maynard-Moody, Steven)

PUAD 937

Doctoral Seminar in Qualitative Methods

Even in this era of Big Data, qualitative research methods retain an enduring prominence across the social sciences. This introductory seminar begins by exploring the truth claims of social research, issues which are alive in all stages of qualitative work, from negotiating entry to the field through writing up our observations. We examine the debates between qualitative and quantitative methods, focusing on the question on whether these divergent approaches share standards of evidence and argument.

The seminar then turns to doing qualitative methods and explores a wide range of issues, such as proposal drafting and ethics, and techniques for gathering and examining "textual" information. We discuss documents, observations, interviews, focus groups, narrative, and computer-aided qualitative analysis. Students will gather (documents, archived qualitative texts, social media) or collect (interviews, images, narratives, oral history) three different forms of qualitative information on a research topic of their choice. They will analyze these “texts” for a journal article “findings section,” the primary written product of the seminar.

This seminar is designed for graduate students in the social sciences. For students interested in doing qualitative research, this is essential material. For those of you committed to quantitative work, this seminar will expand your general understanding of research and increase your understanding of the qualitative contributions to your literature. Many research projects and teams now combine quantitative and qualitative methods and shared understanding fosters multidisciplinary and multi-methods studies.

Spring 2016 & Fall 2017
(Maynard-Moody, Steven)

PUAD 939

Policy Governance, Neoliberalism, and the Carceral State

This doctoral seminar examines the theoretical roots of contemporary issues in governance and policy. We will begin with Stuarts’ book and explore beyond the public management discourse to a discussion of policy governance and policy politics. Underneath current theories of the state and expressions of state power is the “disciplinary turn” based on Neoliberal theories that redefine the relationship of the individual and society. A major expression of this change is summarized in the term “The Carceral State,” which has come to mean more general changes in society than mass incarceration and zero-tolerance policing. With the guidance of Visiting Professor Gitte Sommers Harrits (Political Science, Aarhus University, Denmark) we will also discuss prominent European social theorists, such as Michel Foucault and Pierre Bourdieu.

Spring 2017
(Maynard-Moody, Steven)

SOC 910

Special Topics: Feminist Methodology

Feminists have led the effort to develop approaches to doing social science research that reduce social biases and help further the cause of social justice. They have raised awareness of the impact of social location on the production of knowledge, how the relationship between knowledge and power plays out in each stage of the research process, and how the questions of scholarly ethics is broader than we had been assuming. In this seminar we will discuss how these issues play out in the context of specific research projects. Students will work through the implications of this literature for how they might organize their own research project in ways that are the most reliable, valid, and ethical. By the end of the semester, you should be able to identify and justify feminist standards for responsible and valid research; use these feminist critical standards to evaluate the research of others; implement feminist principles in designing and conducting your own research.

Fall 2016
(Sprague, Joey)

SOC 910

Special Topics: Narrative Methods

The course starts with the epistemological assumptions underlying qualitative research in general and then those that undergird narrative research methodology:  among them, the idea that interviews are co-constructed in the sense that those we speak with are indeed reacting to us as individuals and might construct other life stories if someone else were doing the interview.

We will cover such issues as: theories of narratives, how to do research projects based on constructing and interpreting narrative.  We will look at postmodern approaches to authorial authority and the need to write about who we are and what we bring to narrative studies. I teach about different approaches to narrative construction and analysis; several ways to think about credibility in narrative studies, and how to contextualize validity in relation to epistemology and the theoretical orientation of a study.  We will learn how to recognize genres of narratives in terms of their use of plot, key characters and the passage of time. 

Students will design a research question suited for narrative analysis, schedule and conduct a few interviews (4 or 5) and then write an analytic paper based on the author’s interpretation of the narrative accounts co-produced during those conversations we call interviews, and relate these findings to broader issues in the study of society.

Fall 2014 & Fall 2016 & Fall 2017
(Davidman, Lynn)

SOC 910

Special Topics: Qualitative Methods

Qualitative research focuses on methods of observing and studying people in their everyday lives with the goal of understanding the social world from their perspectives. In this class we examine a variety of strategies for conducting such research. Once those perspectives are gleaned, we analyze them within the broader social context of ideologies, institutions, and social policies. This seminar will acquaint students with the history, logic, methods, and vocabulary of qualitative inquiry through a variety of readings and research activities. Students will  gain an appreciation of the ethics of social research and get first-hand experience in collecting and analyzing qualitative data. 

Spring 2014 & Spring 2016 (Hill, Shirley)

SPED 985

Naturalistic Research

This course is designed to develop skills in naturalistic or constructivist research, while situating it theoretically within the broader framework of modern and postmodern social inquiry, and exploring its social, political and ethical implications. The course develops students' skills in using this form of interpretive qualitative research, provides a theoretical framework for selecting inquiry paradigms, compares and contrasts positivist and constructivist inquiry, and reviews social and political implications of constructivist inquiry.

Spring 2014 (Skrtic, Tom)

SPED 985

Naturalistic Inquiry

The primary goal of this course is to develop students' basic skills in designing and implementing a naturalistic/constructivist inquiry through problem-focused, experiential learning. Students will learn naturalistic methods by working as a team to carry out a naturalistic/constructivist study. Additionally, this course will (a) situate naturalistic/constructivist research theoretically within the broader framework of modern social inquiry; and (b) explore the social, political and ethical implications of constructivist inquiry.

Spring 2016
(Annamma, Subini)

SPED 985

Naturalistic Research

Rooted in critical theories of race, dis/ability and intersectionality, the aims of this course are to explore and conduct research using naturalistic methodology. In order to build student proficiencies in designing and implementing naturalistic research, students will learn a variety of methods by working as a team to carry out a study. Additionally, this course will (a) situate critical naturalistic research theoretically within the broader framework of modern social inquiry; and (b) explore the social, political and ethical implications of this inquiry.

Spring 2017
(Annamma, Subini)

SW 978

Research Design and Methods

This class is an in-depth introduction to the process of conducting research. This introduction provides the essential context for the qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research courses.

Fall 2015
(Staff)

SW 979

Methods of Qualitative Inquiry

This course provides a detailed overview of knowledge and skills in qualitative inquiry. It examines issues in the philosophy of science and paradigms for qualitative inquiry in social work. It emphasizes principles and procedures for qualitative inquiry design, including an introduction to data collection, analysis, report writing, while attending to criteria for establishing trustworthiness.

Spring 2014
(Canda, Edward R)

Spring 2015
(Staff)

Spring 2017
(Koenig, Terry)

Spring 2020
(Koenig, Terry)

SW 988

Mixing Methods in Social Science Research

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of mixed methods research, consisting of the history and philosophy of mixed methods research, the emerging literature on it, purposes and characteristics of mixed methods research, types of research problems addressed, the specification of mixed methods purpose statements and research questions, types of major mixed methods designs, data collection and analysis strategies within mixed methods designs, and reporting and evaluating mixed methods studies.

Offered every other year in the spring semester. Next offering will be Spring 2017. (Adams, Deb)

WGSS 701

Seminar in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies in the Archives

The pioneering historian Mary Beard once said “No documents. No history.” While historical methods have broadened since Beard’s time to include oral history, public history and more, the archive still remains central to scholarship on individuals, groups, social movements and more. In this class we will explore the usefulness of the archive for research in women, gender and sexuality topics as well as learn practical methods of archival research. We will read theoretical assessments of the archive, case studies based on archival research, and discuss new phenomena such as the digital archive and community archive.

Spring 2015 & Spring 2016
(Schofield, Ann)

WGSS 802

Feminist Methodologies

An introduction to the methods used in feminist research in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences (e.g., quantitative and qualitative research methods, archival research, and oral histories). We will consider examples of applications of each method, the strengths and limitations of each method, and how each method relates to feminist theories and principles. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor.

Spring 2014
(Britton, Hannah)

Fall 2014
(Doan, Alesha E)

Spring 2016
(Britton, Hannah)

Spring 2017
(Vanderhurst, Stacey)

Fall 2018 & Spring 2019
(Britton, Hannah)

Fall 2019
(Takeyama, Akiko)

This course is taught once a year.

Spring 2020
(Vanderhurst, Stacey)




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