Teaching

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Learn more about ASHTI "live lab" in Spring 2015

Upcoming/Current Courses

Course Number

Course Title

Short Description

Semester Taught

AMS 696/998 & CEAS 500 Race/Gender/Work/Globalization Unpaid, underpaid, or devalued labors are often framed as “labors of love.” Everyday examples could be as concrete as housework and as seemingly intangible as affective support. Many of these labors are also naturalized as voluntary, feminine, docile, and insignificant compared to the “real” laboring performed in boardrooms, high-rise towers, college classrooms, and political offices. Through the circuits of globalization, much of these labors are relegated to an increasingly female migrant workforce. One of the goals of this course is to examine the cultural, social, economical, and political underpinnings that form the conditions of possibility for various “labors of love” in the ages of globalization. Readings for this course will center the labor of Central American workers in South Korea, Filipino seafarers, "international"/domestic workers, call centers and gestational surrogacy, and the labor underwriting commodity chains. Spring 2017
(Kim)
WGSS 396/701 & ANTH 501/775 Migration and Human Trafficking This course examines issues surrounding migration and human trafficking on a global scale by employing a variety of interdisciplinary and critical approaches. Growing interest in the topic has generated diverse narratives and debates. Some scholars examine the causes, conditions, and implications of fundamental changes that define the massive movement of people in the age of globalization. Others differentiate migration from smuggling and human trafficking. Some others equate human trafficking to prostitution and focus on sexual exploitation and violence against women. And yet, a handful of critical scholars and activists point out that the actual voices of men and women who are involved in human trafficking are largely silenced in the dominant narratives of “rescuing” the victims, especially when they are from the global South. Instead of taking all these different claims and approaches at face value, we will explore the ways that the differences emerge in theories and methods. We will do so by self-reflexively examining sociohistorical contexts, moral values, and conflicting interests in political, legal, and economic practices when consent and coercion are blurry and the whole picture is unknown. Thus, this course critically explores in-congruencies in the existing analytical categories and tackles such concepts and practices as human agency, human rights, and structural violence in everyday lives. Fall 2016
(Takeyama)
LAW 980/WGSS 701 Sex Crimes This course focuses on theory, empirical research, and doctrine related to substantive sex crimes and collateral restrictions on sex offenders. In particular, the course addresses rape, child molestation, incest, child pornography, prostitution, obscenity, and the legal pornography industry. In the latter part of the semester, students will also explore emerging legal issues surrounding sex offender registration requirements, residency restrictions, and civil commitment. Fall 2016
(Yung and Deer)
SOC 573 Sociology of Violence This course will examine violence in social and political life. The causes and consequences of various types of violence will be examined in a variety of social settings. Examples include violence in the family, schools, the workplace, violence in cities, and violence as a part of the political process: assassination, revolution, coups, terrorism, and government repression. Fall 2016
(Donovan)

Previous Courses

Course Number

Course Title

Short Description

Semester Taught

ENGL 317 Topics in American Literature to 1865: Literature of Slavery and Abolition The war over slavery in the U.S. was waged with words as well as weapons. In this course, we will study a broad range of works produced between the late-eighteenth century and the start of the Civil War that ask whether slavery should persist in a country founded on the proposition that all men are created equal. We will read: slave narratives testifying to the humanity of the enslaved and the inhumanity of their owners; anti-slavery fiction and poetry appealing to the sympathy of white readers; calls to African Americans for armed resistance; fictions touting the benevolence of masters; dramas (including minstrel sketches) that establish enduring stereotypes; and speeches contesting slavery’s basis in scripture, science, and law. In addition to studying how and why authors framed their arguments concerning slavery, we will explore how the literature of slavery preserves the experience of enslaved people—and how it should inform the fight against human trafficking in the twenty-first century. Readings to be drawn from works by: Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, William Lloyd Garrison, Lydia Maria Child, Frederick Douglass, William Wells Brown, Angelina Grimké, Harriet Beecher Stowe, John Greenleaf Whittier, Frances E. W. Harper, Harriet Jacobs, Solomon Northup, Hannah Bond, Sojourner Truth, John Brown, Dion Boucicault, Edgar Allan Poe, William Gilmore Simms, Mary Eastman, and Herman Melville. We will also view Django Unchained and Twelve Years a Slave—two recent films inspired by nineteenth-century literature that, in very different ways, reflect on the legacy of slavery in American life. In addition to actively participating in class discussion, students will complete in-class quizzes, two exams, two papers, a research project, and a presentation. This course fulfills the English 320 or equivalent requirement for the English major. Fall 2014
Tues/Thurs 11:00-12:15
(Mielke)
HIST 390 Roots of Human Trafficking: Imperialism, Modern Slavery and Africa This reading intensive seminar explores human trafficking in the modern world. It will examine labor exploitation and commercialization in a historical perspective. The course aims to explore how Imperialism led to the expansion of human trafficking and how women, men and children experienced labor exploitation in different ways. We will examine how forced labor was/is behind the car and bicycle industries, sugar, coffee, and chocolate consumption. This course will discuss similarities and differences between contemporary and historical slavery and analyze why and how it persists. Readings will include accounts of people held in bondage, case studies, and reports. Students will develop familiarity with major historical concepts, themes, and subjects. Students will also engage, investigate, and understand history as a process to explain how we make sense of the past and the present. Students will carry on a research project throughout the semester about the historical roots of a modern case of slavery and/or human trafficking, producing original scholarship. Spring 2015
TBD
(Candido)
POLS/WGSS 600 Contemporary Feminist Political Theory This course examines contemporary feminist political theory. During the semester, we will examine the challenges of second and third wave feminism by exploring issues of difference within the intersections of race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, social position, ability, and geographic location. We will think about how these issues have become central to feminist theorizing and to the mobilization of gender activists. We will assess the impact of globalization and the importance of post-colonial theory for contemporary feminist thought, particularly by examining the voices and ideas of those who have been historically excluded from such discussions. Finally, we will work toward an understanding of what these issues mean for the future of feminist thought, gender activists, and feminists. This course has been selected to participate in the State Department's Fall 2014 Diplomacy Lab to examine the Trafficking in Persons and Human Rights. Students will be engaged in understanding contemporary issues of human trafficking, including the debates within feminist and human rights perspectives of how best to address this issue. Students may participate in applying theories from the course to the real world issue of human trafficking in South and Central Asia. Fall 2014
Tues/Thurs 11:00-12:15
(Britton)
POLS 689 International Human Rights Since the end of World War II, the world has witnessed the growth of liberal principles and rising support for human rights. Yet, the increasing professions of international morality have not been matched by a reduction of brutal power struggles, improvements in human condition, and unwavering commitment to human rights. The promotion and protection of human rights remains one of the primary issues in world politics. This seminar is designed to systematically examine this issue. It will delve into the questions about the nature, approaches, and tensions in the contemporary international human rights, including the issues of modern-day slavery, human trafficking, and other forms of servitude that are antithetical to the respect for human dignity. Fall 2014
(Omelicheva)
PRVM 852 Health Care for Special Populations This graduate-level course examines the health and social needs of population groups with higher-than-average risk of disease, disability, and negative social outcomes. Such groups include low-income racial and ethnic minorities, urban adolescents, people in jails/prisons, the homeless, drug users, immigrants, and people living with HIV/AIDS. The course utilizes the disciplines of social epidemiology and medical sociology to explore the individual, community, and structural-level determinants of health and implications for health care.

For fall 2014, we will focus specifically on the health needs of "victims of human trafficking," e.g. those mean and women who voluntarily/ non-voluntarily participate in migrant labor and sex work. The course will culminate in a service project for KU Hospital, in which students will help implement and develop a process evaluation for the implementation of a protocol to identify “victims of human trafficking” in the KU Hospital Emergency Department. During this course, students will engage in directed readings and discussions about the politics of human trafficking, the health and social needs of both migrant laborers and sex workers, as well as conduct key informant interviews with the local agencies that serve these groups.
Fall 2014
Wed 2:00-5:00
(Ramaswamy)
WGSS 500/
POLS 600
Contemporary Feminist Political Theory This course examines contemporary feminist political theory. During the semester, we will pay particular attention to the nexus of feminist theory, political theory, and practice. We will examine the challenges of second and third wave feminism by exploring issues of difference within the intersections of race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, social position, ability, and geographic location. We will think about how these issues have become central to feminist theorizing and to the mobilization of gender activists. We will assess the impact of globalization and the importance of post-colonial theory for contemporary feminist thought, particularly by examining the voices and ideas of those who have been historically excluded from such discussions. We will also discuss questions about the relationships and possibilities of solidarity/oppression among women globally. Finally, we will work toward an understanding of what these issues mean for the future of feminist thought, gender activists, and feminists. We will have several places where we gain breadth (understanding the range of feminist theories), and several places where we gain depth (in-depth examinations of gender and militarism, of human trafficking, of creating livable lives by expanding our understanding of public policy and social norms). Fall 2015
(Britton)
WGSS 701/
POLS 959
The Politics of Human Trafficking This graduate seminar examines the politics of human trafficking and contemporary slavery using an interdisciplinary approach. During the semester, we will examine key aspects of human trafficking by asking what is human trafficking? What are the characteristics of human trafficking? What are the contributing factors to trafficking? We will begin the semester by examining how contemporary slavery and modern day trafficking is operating. We will pay particular attention to how difficult it is empirically to study trafficking – because both the crime and the victims are often hidden, and victims often do not report their situation to authorities. While estimates of human trafficking vary widely, we currentlyhave very limited verifiable evidence of the extent of trafficking in any one area. We will also examine some of the key policies internationally, comparatively, and domestically that address human trafficking. We will think about what frameworks and ideologies shape those policies. Human trafficking has been one of the most non-partisan issues we have seen in the past several decades, bringing together policy makers that would otherwise never work incoalition. Yet, the current movement to end trafficking also has deep ideological divisions. There are surprising, uncharacteristic divisions among groups that would otherwise be in unity. As part of the class, we will examine the contemporary social movement to end trafficking, and we will attempt to understand the contentious politics found within the movement. We will work to understand the competing voices in the movement and to understand how the framing of this issue can have a significant impact on the implementation of policies. Fall 2013
(Britton)
WGSS 802/
POLS 708
Feminist Methodologies/Qualitative Research Methods This course is designed to introduce you to the debates and approaches in qualitative research methods and feminist social science methodology within an interdisciplinary approach. It will also serve as an introduction to the most used qualitative methods and as a laboratory to practice using these techniques and strategies. This course assumes you have had basic courses in research design and methodology. Over the course of the semester, we will examine some of the main methods used, and we analyze the comparative strengths and weaknesses of each method as well as discuss the most appropriate method for different research questions. During the course, you will be able to engage the methodological and epistemological debates concerning feminist research and qualitative research in particular. We will read and discuss work by researchers, especially focusing on the lessons they learned and the challenges they faced. Your semester project will be based on the “live lab” qualitative pilot project. You will be involved in the Anti-Slavery and Human Trafficking Initiative (ASHTI) research at KU. You will be working with the interview protocols used in the ASHTI project; you will be doing participant observations of HT events, programs, trainings; you will be doing content analysis of training materials, state policies, etc.; and you will facilitate a focus group with local anti-trafficking student/community activists. Spring 2016
(Britton)